Members of the European Parliament adopt the AI Act

On Wednesday, 13 March, the European Parliament approved the Artificial Intelligence Act, ensuring safety, compliance with fundamental rights and promoting innovation. Having been negotiated with EU Member States in December 2023, the regulation gain...

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On Wednesday, 13 March, the European Parliament approved the Artificial Intelligence Act, ensuring safety, compliance with fundamental rights and promoting innovation. Having been negotiated with EU Member States in December 2023, the regulation gained endorsement from MEPs with 523 votes in favour, 46 against and 49 abstentions.

The legislation establishes a structured framework for regulating technology, organising it into tiers according to perceived risk levels and assigning distinct deadlines for implementing corresponding measures.

Certain AI applications, like algorithmic social scoring, will be banned by the end of 2024. Conversely, high-risk uses such as critical infrastructure will be subject to more rigorous regulations. According to the current schedule, complete enforcement is expected by 2026.

It protect fundamental rights, democracy, the rule of law and environmental sustainability from high-risk AI, while boosting innovation and establishing Europe as a leader in the field. The regulation establishes obligations for AI based on its potential risks and level of impact. The regulation outlines obligations for AI based on its potential risks and impact levels.

Under the new rules, specific AI applications threatening citizens’ rights are banned. These include biometric categorisation systems based on sensitive characteristics, untargeted scraping of facial images from the internet or CCTV footage for facial recognition databases, emotion recognition in workplaces and schools, social scoring, predictive policing solely based on profiling or assessing characteristics and AI exploiting human vulnerabilities or manipulating behaviour.

The use of biometric identification systems (RBI) by law enforcement is generally prohibited, except in narrowly defined situations. Real-time RBI deployment is conditional on stringent safeguards, such as limited usage in time and geography and prior judicial or administrative authorisation. Post-facto use (“post-remote RBI”) is considered high-risk and necessitates judicial authorisation linked to a criminal offense.

National-level regulatory sandboxes and real-world testing will have to be established at in order to facilitate the development and training of innovative AI accessible to SMEs and startups before market placement.

If you interested in how the AI Act can be implemented, you can learn more about etami, one of BDVA’s Task Forces. etami creates processes and tools to enable ethical, trustworthy and legal AI. etami translates European and global principles for ethical AI into actionable and measurable guidelines, tools and methods. Find out more!

Source: European Parliament press release